Sophy King

Art, Landscape, Environment

Gold River Bed

Environmental Art Installation, I-Park Foundation, Connecticut, 2016

The site is a dry river bed during a drought. This work is like an offering to the gods of rain. I am playing with ideas of value and worth, using humble moss and concrete alongside precious gold.  At the end of the day the missing element is the most precious one of all – the water that should be running freely down the creek.

concrete, gold leaf, moss

Rehabit

Rehabit, 2016, environmental installation, I-Park Foundation Connecticut

reclaimed doors, rebar, moss

The sculpture sits in a clearing in 500 acres of forest in Connecticut USA, the site of a vernal pool.  Rehabit was my first project to be completed during my residency at I-Park.  Recycled doors are cut into letters and covered in moss.  The site is a vernal pool and as the doors slowly rot down they form a new habitat for the moss, fueling a cycle of growth and decay.  The concept of rehabitation links into my research on regeneration in cities, and the word REHAB has so many negative connotations I though it was interesting to site it here; within such a natural, wholesome environment.  The relationship between ‘natural’ and ‘manmade’ is at the heart of this piece.

 

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Residents(Residence)

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  Collaborative project with the Landscape Architect Dorothy Bothwell

This project is part of a conceptual series of habitat enrichment interventions at the I-Park Foundation

The sculptural form of the incubator cages (in this case a tower) protect young native beneficial plants.  As the form breaks down, the plants take over and begin to colonise the site, improving biodiversity.

In this case the introduced plant is the Marginal Wood Fern, Dryopteris marginalis.  The project can be expanded to take on different typologies; meadow and marshland as well as woodland. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Birds Of Passage

Birds of Passage is an LED Board commissioned by the RSPB for their sculpture trail at Fairhaven Lake, Lancs.  The board is programmed with animations, information and live updates.  The area is one of the most important estuaries for migratory birds in the country and Birds of Passage acts as an arrivals board, telling visitors what species are in the estuary and where they have come from.